Thirteenth Sunday after Pentecost – 19th August 2018

A reflection from 1 Kings

This week in the Old Testament, we hear of the enthronement of King Solomon, son of David. He is but a boy when placed on the throne, but is discerning and already wise. So wise in fact, that he asks God for wisdom to govern fairly and justly, rather than for long life and riches. God is suitably impressed and declares that if Solomon lives a righteous life, like David his father, he would get all he has asked for, and so much more. But, was David righteous? I remember how David took Bathsheba in an adulterous manner and then had her husband killed, so he could keep her. Not righteous in my reckoning. But God says David is righteous. Many of us believe that righteousness is the opposite of sin. If David sinned, how is he righteous? And what of the churches teaching on sin and righteousness?

The church teaches that every human is sinful. Because of this, we need to confess our sin and receive absolution and forgiveness from God. But is that all we do? If you were to ask 1000 people what sin is, you would get a thousand different answers. Most of us, even though we are often taught the same thing, have a vastly different idea about sin. Now most people, might say; that sins are wrongs, confessed, absolved and forgiven. Sin has a scriptural base. Sin is bad. What they might not tell you, is how sin affects them personally. What they believe their personal sin is. Things like, ‘I shouldn’t have said, or done, or thought differently. I must be better. I must be more. I am hopeless. I don’t deserve this. I am unworthy, I am sinful’.

Now this kind of thinking is dangerous, but very human. One because it is hidden, insidious and destructive and two, because its not true. Ultimately, it doesn’t matter what you do, say, or think, how you live, your lifestyle, your gender, age, sexuality, piety, or righteousness. Ultimately, sin is separation from God. When you think you’re not good enough and even God can’t love you, or forgive you, or want you, you are separated from God’s abiding and indwelling love of you, for yourself. This is sin.

God has created you in all your beauty and complexity, to live and have your being in relationship with God. Everything you do, including confession, is to foster this relationship with God and its good. Everything you do which negates yourself, also negates God. This is sin. In short, sin is our human condition of separation from our Creator, Redeemer and Sanctifier.

The absolute genius of Christ’s life and sacrifice, is that Jesus was never separated from God and therefore never sinned. He remained in relationship with God, his whole life, until he took our sin, our very human life of separation, into himself declaring, God why have you forsaken me? Jesus who lived a sin free; zero separation life from God, took our completely separated life from God and died in our place. This was the only way to forever connect us to the love and forgiveness of God for ever. It could be said, that Jesus is the answer to original sin.

During confession this week, I want you think about how you have sinned, separated yourself from God’s forgiveness and love. Then imagine God’s joy in you, when you return to God’s embrace. You are loved, cherished and adored by your God in relationship with you.

Have an awesome week, working on correcting your own relationship with God. Shalom (God’s deep abiding, indwelling peace) be with you.

Donna (Locum Vicar)

Twelfth Sunday after Pentecost – 12th August 2018

In the first reading today we have the beginning of God’s response to Job:

From the heart of the tempest, the Lord gave Job his answer…’Who put the sea behind closed doors?… come thus far and no further …I marked the bounds it was not to cross.’

In scripture, the stormy sea is often used a as symbol of chaos and the power of evil. We read today’s Gospel in light of this. It is not simply a story about a storm at sea,. It represents Jesus as the one who has conquered the power and the force of evil. This was an important story for the early church struggling against powerful opposition. The image of a small boat battling against a heavy sea and a violent storm fitted the early Church well.

The imagery will always be apt. Job’s questions, the struggle with pain and suffering, the ‘Whys?’ we never answer, the strength of the influences that work against decency and goodness – in all this we need the assurance of God’s presence and God’s pledge that goodness and right will win in the end.

God is With Us
Reflections for Sundays
Michael Morwood MSC

Eleventh Sunday after Pentecost – 5th August 2018

This is what the kingdom of God is like………

Gospel

The literal meaning of ‘kingdom’ is ‘rule’. Jesus is trying to describe what the rule of God is like. Clearly, he does not describe this in terms of rules and laws.

Rather, he uses stories to describe God’s extraordinary love and mercy. Using that as a basis, Jesus then calls on his hearers to love and forgive as graciously as God loves and forgives. Then, and only then, will God’s ‘rule’ be evident among us.

Today’s Gospel highlights that God’s rule is already active among us, even when it does not seem evident….night and day…sprouting and growing like the seed that is planted in the field. It might be like a very small seed, but the possibilities are great.

God is With Us
Reflections for Sundays
Michael Morwood MSC